Read more about the article France and Germany Towards Security and Defence Integration: Same Goal, Different Approaches
https://stock.adobe.com/it/Library/urn:aaid:sc:eu:55babda0-25b2-4ead-8ad2-0a594af82667?asset_id=175974920

France and Germany Towards Security and Defence Integration: Same Goal, Different Approaches

The idea of a collective European security and defence architecture first arose from the ashes of World War II and was driven by the Cold War. The forerunner of the European Union, the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC), was primarily designed to pacify France and Germany, and virtually make war between the two major European powers impossible by tying them economically (Vandersmissen 2018, 16-17). Politically, however, they had different ideas on how such a community might cover security concerns. The very issue of the remilitarisation of West Germany hindered the creation of a European Defence Community (EDC). Ultimately, the project was struck down by the French National Assembly in 1954 to retain sovereignty over France’s armed forces (Trybus 2016). The ratification of the Treaty of Brussels that same year solved the issue by creating the Western European Union (WEU), and approving the creation of the Bundeswehr, which was envisioned as a self-defence force, dependent upon allied support for any meaningful military operation. Indeed, the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation enjoyed exclusive competence over the defence of Europe for most of the remaining years of the 20th century (Vandersmissen 2018, 30; and Trybus 2016). But while Germany seemed satisfied with such an accommodation, France grew increasingly suspicious of American political and military influence over the continent. It left the Organisation’s military command and, in 1966, asked NATO and US troops to leave its soil. It wasn’t until 2009 that France re-joined the security framework (Gjevori 2019).

Comments Off on France and Germany Towards Security and Defence Integration: Same Goal, Different Approaches
Read more about the article Member States Advocate for the Relaunching of the Undeployed EU Battlegroups
European Battle Group Excercise, Franklin Moore, 20 February, 2014 (Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:European_Battle_Group_Excercise_140220-A-OO646-258.jpg)

Member States Advocate for the Relaunching of the Undeployed EU Battlegroups

After more than 20 years since EU member states first discussed the idea of a quick response military instrument, EU Battlegroups are again regaining visibility due to the current institutional efforts to move forward in security and defence.

Comments Off on Member States Advocate for the Relaunching of the Undeployed EU Battlegroups

EU`s Strategic Compass for Security and Defence: A New Approach in 2021

On 16 June 2020, the EU Defence Ministers embarked to develop a strategic compass for security and defence. On 6 May 2021, the EU Council Ministers held another meeting, part of a series since 2020, negotiating the format of the legal-political agreement expected to be issued at the end of 2022. The Strategic Compass is seen as one of the most ambitious plans to unify the EU response in Security and Defence. The present analysis aims to briefly describe its novelty, lay down the spirit surrounding such initiative, and identify the challenges ahead. By the end, a few recommendations for boosting the EU action in defence will be provided, such as dormant provisions of the EU Treaties that have not or to a little extent been used but can prove to be imperative. 

Comments Off on EU`s Strategic Compass for Security and Defence: A New Approach in 2021